A
B

At the top, the robots have left their lifepod after crashing at the edge of Utapau’s Dune Sea, and in the middle, Luke is confronted by a rodent-like creature in a Mos Eisley cantina (both paintings are based on draft two). At the bottom, the reddish-yellow planet of Yavin can be seen from its lush fourth moon. All three production paintings were made by Ralph McQuarrie.



C D

Chewbacca began as an unnamed furry alien in the story synopsis, and became a “Wookee” prince in the rough draft. When the second draft was written, there was no room for the forest battle and the Wookee tribe, so Lucas turned the primitive Chewbacca into the “Wookiee” co-pilot. These three sketches by Ralph McQuarrie show the development of Chewbacca from draft two (yellow-eyed, with a flak jacket and cloth shorts) to the official screenplay (blue-eyed, wearing only his chrome bandoliers). Note how the frightening features were softened in the process, as the Wookiee evolved into a more sympathetic character.





E

Three production paintings by Ralph McQuarrie, depicting the idea of technology in opposition to mankind. At the top, the two “droids”, representing humanity, escapes from the ungainly “Jawa sandcrawler” (from draft two). The other two paintings show a confrontation with the “fascist” stormtroopers (note that one has a “laser sword”), and the attack on the “Death Star”.



F
G H

The flashily dressed Biggs Darklighter, the sexy Camie, and the rugged Fixer were introduced in the third draft—the top left sketches were done by John Mollo. The first photo is from the scene where Luke (Mark Hamill) spots the overtaking of Leia’s ship with his “electrobinoculars”. The bottom left photos show Luke and Biggs (Garrick Hagon) having a conversation at the Anchorhead power station. Both of these scenes were cut prior to the film’s release. The 1977 comic adaptation (bottom right), written by Roy Thomas, was printed before the final editing of the movie, and the entire Biggs subplot can be found there.



I
J K

The sketch at the top left is John Mollo’s original interpretation of Jabba the Hut. He is a humanoid gangster here, and stands in front of one of his henchmen.The top right photo shows George Lucas at the Docking Bay 94 set with Harrison Ford (Han Solo), and Declan Mulholland who played the part of Jabba. The other two photos are taken from the cut footage. Howard Chaykin, who pencilled the Marvel Comics adaptation (bottom right), did not have a finished scene to look at, and had to make his own interpretation of Jabba.



L
M N

Lucas was toying with many ideas as he revised his screenplay drafts. At one point he had Luke as a sixteen-year-old girl who fell in love with Han Solo. This version was probably a revision of the second script, since the top painting, with Luke on a bluff overlooking Mos Eisley, lacks Ben (who was introduced in the third draft). Furthermore, Han was bearded in draft two, but not in the third script. The painting and sketches were made by Ralph McQuarrie.



A Starkiller Multimedia Source Page.

B The Star Wars Portfolio by Ralph McQuarrie.

C Titelman, Carol (ed.) (1994), The Art of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, p. 66.

F Titelman, Carol (ed.) (1994), The Art of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, p. 67.

E Starkiller Multimedia Source Page.

F Titelman, Carol (ed.) (1994), The Art of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, p. 26.

G The Star Wars Home Page.

H Classic Star Wars: A New Hope #2 (1994), p. 33.

I Classic Star Wars: A New Hope #1 (1994), p. 62.

J The Star Wars Home Page.

K Classic Star Wars: A New Hope #1 (1994), p. 31.

L Titelman, Carol (1994), The Art of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, p. 56.

M Titelman, Carol (1994), The Art of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, p. 17.

N Titelman, Carol (1994), The Art of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, p. 68.